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Marble Easter Eggs



This technique for making marble Easter eggs is my new favorite way to dye eggs. What's that? Easter is over? Well, guess what? This is too fun, easy, and minimally-messy to only do once a year. Plus, if you're anything like me, you probably had a pretty packed day/week celebrating Easter and didn't even get to dye eggs (this was the first year we've ever actually dyed eggs since Camaron and I got married. We've bought kits, but we always forget to actually do it!). 



First, start with a few hard-boiled eggs. The only downside to this technique is that the eggs may not be edible after they're colored. No scientific tests were done to prove this, but shaving cream is used and it might seep through the egg shells, so you may want to boil some extra eggs if you're in the mood for deviled eggs;)



Next, fill a pan with shaving cream. We used two different pans so we could create two different color schemes. Add a multiple drops of  different colored food dye to the shaving cream. Stir the color around just a little bit using a toothpick or back of a paintbrush. Don't over-mix, just stir enough to create a marble-looking effect.



Add your eggs to the shaving cream and roll them around a little using tongs, so they are completely covered. Then, transfer the eggs to a cooling rack with a baking sheet underneath (I lined mine with a paper towel, just to be safe).


The eggs now just need to sit for 5-10 minutes, then you can wipe off the shaving cream. I rinsed mine a little, but that rinsed off most of the dye. So, only rinse minimally, if you must rinse. You can also let the eggs sit for a few hours and the dye will evaporate. This was a lot of fun (especially for Fox), and non-messy, with a beautiful outcome.

p.s. I looked into it, and if you use whipped cream instead of shaving cream, it's edible!






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